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Errare humanum est - or is it?
#1
Errare humanum est - or is it?
How about a different approach to this - we have become so used to it that we automatically defend others as well ourselves in this manner. HOWEVER: don't you think there is another side to this... I mean - this saying sort of encourages clumsiness and recklessness - you are human so you are clumsy and stupid anyway so don't even bother... Don't get me wrong, I don't mean that everybody who makes a mistake should be executed or that I never make mistakes or something - far from it - but don't you think this proverb is actually toxic and discourages anyone from ever striving for perfection (or near-perfection) in anything? I mean look at how clumsy and stagnant we all are in a sense - maybe becuase of the stupid proverb clinging to the back of our heads? And how about its origins? Does it not come from ancient Rome and in particular the time when it was actually beginning to rot from the head down due to infection with poisonous Christian mentality... I would be glad to learn about the origins of this. Christianity encourages stagnation, submission etc. it hates independence and self-empowerment so how about this one... Is it really "human" to be clumsy, reckless or mean or stupid or whatever - or are we made that way by religion among other things?
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#2
RE: Errare humanum est - or is it?
(September 6, 2012 at 6:20 pm)Ciel_Rouge Wrote: How about a different approach to this - we have become so used to it that we automatically defend others as well ourselves in this manner. HOWEVER: don't you think there is another side to this... I mean - this saying sort of encourages clumsiness and recklessness - you are human so you are clumsy and stupid anyway so don't even bother... Don't get me wrong, I don't mean that everybody who makes a mistake should be executed or that I never make mistakes or something - far from it - but don't you think this proverb is actually toxic and discourages anyone from ever striving for perfection (or near-perfection) in anything? I mean look at how clumsy and stagnant we all are in a sense - maybe becuase of the stupid proverb clinging to the back of our heads? And how about its origins? Does it not come from ancient Rome and in particular the time when it was actually beginning to rot from the head down due to infection with poisonous Christian mentality... I would be glad to learn about the origins of this. Christianity encourages stagnation, submission etc. it hates independence and self-empowerment so how about this one... Is it really "human" to be clumsy, reckless or mean or stupid or whatever - or are we made that way by religion among other things?

The origin is attributed to Augustine of Hippo who was, in fact, a Christian. However, the original context of the phrase is much better than your interpretation here.

"Humanum fuit errare, diabolicum est per animositatem in errore manere" - which translates to "To err is human, but its diabolical to remain in error". Its encouraging the opposite of stagnation and asking you to move past and correct those errors.
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#3
RE: Errare humanum est - or is it?
I suppose by errors he meant diverting from Christianity so it makes the whole thing more complicated Smile Still, I think the commonly perceived meaning is completely detached from the original context. I find it rather amusing that mediocrity is encouraged and no widespread religion or philosophy takes us in the direction of being stronger, faster, happier or whatever... They just want us to submit, obey and live a shitty life instead of any kind of personal development.
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#4
RE: Errare humanum est - or is it?
(September 6, 2012 at 6:41 pm)genkaus Wrote:
(September 6, 2012 at 6:20 pm)Ciel_Rouge Wrote: How about a different approach to this - we have become so used to it that we automatically defend others as well ourselves in this manner. HOWEVER: don't you think there is another side to this... I mean - this saying sort of encourages clumsiness and recklessness - you are human so you are clumsy and stupid anyway so don't even bother... Don't get me wrong, I don't mean that everybody who makes a mistake should be executed or that I never make mistakes or something - far from it - but don't you think this proverb is actually toxic and discourages anyone from ever striving for perfection (or near-perfection) in anything? I mean look at how clumsy and stagnant we all are in a sense - maybe becuase of the stupid proverb clinging to the back of our heads? And how about its origins? Does it not come from ancient Rome and in particular the time when it was actually beginning to rot from the head down due to infection with poisonous Christian mentality... I would be glad to learn about the origins of this. Christianity encourages stagnation, submission etc. it hates independence and self-empowerment so how about this one... Is it really "human" to be clumsy, reckless or mean or stupid or whatever - or are we made that way by religion among other things?

The origin is attributed to Augustine of Hippo who was, in fact, a Christian. However, the original context of the phrase is much better than your interpretation here.

"Humanum fuit errare, diabolicum est per animositatem in errore manere" - which translates to "To err is human, but its diabolical to remain in error". Its encouraging the opposite of stagnation and asking you to move past and correct those errors.

You forgot "per animositatem," which means "due to anger," or "willful impetuousness."
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