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Autism Spectrum Disorder
#41
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
(March 26, 2018 at 2:48 pm)Catholic_Lady Wrote: What signs did your mom say you had in childhood? And how come they never got help for you?

A ) It was the early 90s and I think there was slightly less awareness about it then. B ) My pre-school teachers must have been rather ignorant of it, and my mom knew nothing about it. C ) I am high functioning verbally which made it harder to spot. D ). By the time I got to 5 years old I was in primary school and I was only there for a year. The teachers also barely paid any attention to me then, and I was regularly bullied and they just let it happen. Then I was home educated by my parents from age 6 to 18, and as my parents knew nothing about it, that made it impossible for it to get diagnosed. E ) It's not unheard of for someone with high-functioning autism to not be diagnosed until adulthood. To quote from the article I already linked to you (Smile):

Quote:Some people with ASD had features of the condition as a child, but enter adulthood without ever being diagnosed.

I'll take some random quotes from my autism report, that don't give away enough personal information to make me feel too uncomfortable or unsafe to share. I will make one change to it though... I'll change my real name to Hammy and my mom's real name to simply "mom". Some people on AF who I have bonded with know my real name, and some people on AF, like yourself, who have me on Facebook also know my real name, but I'd rather not let the whole forum know. Even my first name. Just to be safe Smile

Okay here's some random quotes regarding my childhood, from my own autism report. This is information gathered from my mom's assessment with the multi-disciplinary team of autism specialists. I shall present it to you under this spoiler tag:


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#42
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
Thanks for sharing that, ham. I read the whole thing.
"Of course, everyone will claim they respect someone who tries to speak the truth, but in reality, this is a rare quality. Most respect those who speak truths they agree with, and their respect for the speaking only extends as far as their realm of personal agreement. It is less common, almost to the point of becoming a saintly virtue, that someone truly respects and loves the truth seeker, even when their conclusions differ wildly." 

-walsh
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#43
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
Well, well, well. Now the wizard of id has given you a diploma you can go forth as brave as a lion, as loving as a tin man and thinkin' as good as Lincoln. When the gypsy offers you more strawberries you'll know you already have fields and fields of them. Let's celebrate with some music and dance.



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#44
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
That's probably my favorite Beatles song actually.

Although I prefer the original for sure:



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#45
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
(March 26, 2018 at 3:05 pm)Minimalist Wrote: Anyway, Hammy.  As far as I'm concerned you're fine.

Yes I'm fine. But my autism is very, very real. They fact I just say I'm fine because I just assume I'm fine by default but I don't know what it even means and I wouldn't know the difference between fine or not fine unless I was in immediate physical danger or afraid of upcoming physical danger... that in itself is one of the many examples of my autism in practice in itself.

Autism hasn't increased in diagnosis because the diagnosis has become so broad that they diagnose just about anybody nowadays. Autism has increased in diagnosis because as technology and expertise and education increases, autism becomes more and more easy to recognize.

About 1 in 100 people are autistic. That isn't exactly just about anybody. But in the past many many people would have been autistic, but it wasn't so easy to spot or be recognized. Especially higher functioning stuff. Otherwise intelligent people who nevertheless have many other symptoms of autism are much harder to spot. What was once considered badly behaved or lazy was often indeed badly behaved or lazy, but there have been many cases in the past where people were seen that way but their behavior and struggles could be explained more easily by their autism. It's the same with mental illness.... what we now recognize as depression would be someone who got told to cheer up and if they couldn't and they didn't get a job they'd get thrown in a mental asylum.

Diagnosis is only increasing because information and technology is, and the experts are getting better at recognizing a condition that was barely even understood in the past. It's just as legitimate as mental illness.

As for the Ritalin comment, you're thinking of ADHD.

And yes, once again. I am fine. I assume I'm fine because I'm not not fine as in I'm not in danger. And I get absorbed in what I'm doing and have fun. But many people wouldn't feel fine in my situation because they'd worry about the rest of their life being a total mess and not developing properly. At least now I know that I'm developing at the normal speed for someone with a developmental disorder.

I am fine, but you only see me posting on AF or have perhaps heard that I chat to people on Skype, make electronic music at home, etc. I basically spend my entire life in my bedroom, I never use my living room, I don't have a TV, I don't have carpets. I don't have a job. I've never had a job. I don't go anywhere besides shopping for food and then going home back to my bedroom. I have no desire for much else. I would be happy with a fully online cybersexual relationship and staying in my bedroom all my life. I'm going to get support to expand further anyways, because it's healthy, and because despite the fact I'll always want to spend 99% of my time in my bedroom.... if I can slowly develop a little bit of confidence and very slowly develop out of my comfort zone at my own pace... I would ideally one day prefer a real life sexual relationship and real life friends. They'd just have to be exactly the right people otherwise I'd disappear back to my bedroom again. And just, like, one or two arguments could make me panic and want to give up on RL again. And it's back to my bedroom because I had an argument with someone.

It would be easier if I forever remained living alone at least. I guess the ideal situation for me would be to meet up with friends and visit friends in RL (when I one day make some) and visit a girlfriend or fuckbuddy, but never let anyone visit me ever. Or even telephone call me when I hadn't pre-arranged it.

I will develop, slowly. At my own pace. If I want to. But there's no denying that my disorder and my autism is very very real.

In the past it would have just been considered "different" and it would have been wrong. Or so incorrect it's what's often deemed not even wrong. EVERYBODY is different. The point is in which ways are people different. Autism is a key difference in some people. And it isn't just a quirk.... yes it can have good points.... because autistic brains tend to be specialized, which is why you get many autistic savants or highly talented autistic people. But overall the disorder is a developmental disorder, that has to impact negatively on their life otherwise it wouldn't be diagnosed as a disorder. One of the key diagnostic requirements is that it has to impact negatively on a person's life.

It's as real as depression or an anxiety disorder.

I think if you were more educated about autism and what it actually is, and knew that it wasn't just a matter of being different or quirky, you'd realize that.

(March 26, 2018 at 3:42 pm)Catholic_Lady Wrote:
(March 26, 2018 at 3:05 pm)Minimalist Wrote: Sometimes I wonder if we aren't doing more harm than good by categorizing people like this.  People used to simply be "different."  Was that such a bad thing?  The word wasn't even coined until 1911 and then only to refer to schizophrenics.  Now it has exploded to the point where the scale is so vast that it seems to be everywhere.  They pump kids full of ritalin or other drugs at the drop of a hat these days because they can't sit still in class and the schools hate that so they are willing co-conspirators with the drug industry because they want obedience.  I don't know.  It seems to me that someone is making a whole lot of money off of this.

I'm probably just being a cranky old fart, again. 

Anyway, Hammy.  As far as I'm concerned you're fine.

This has crossed my mind as well, but upon further research and watching my nephew, I've come to believe it really is a disorder in brain function rather than just a personality trait. I'd love to think you were right though.

People only get diagnosed with disorders if they affect someone's ability to function or cope in some way. That's why we have depression and anxiety disorders seen as mental illness, but we have no "Feeling alright" mental illness. Autism can have its good points, but if it didn't significantly impact someone's life negatively, it wouldn't be a problem and wouldn't need a diagnosis.

Even personality disorder diagnoses are of course not the same thing as personality tests. Autism is not a personality disorder, but even if it was, that's very different to a personality trait. Everyone has personality traits but not everyone has a personality disorder.

Seeing autism as nothing more than being "different" or a trait, and not at all a disorder, is rather dismissive of someone's condition. You wouldn't say someone with depression or anxiety was fine or just "different".

Now indeed, autism is not an illness, and there's nothing wrong with being autistic. But it is a disorder. It does cause people difficulties, or it would be an element of a personality test rather than a diagnosis.

I'm glad you have changed your mind. I wouldn't wish away autism though and I certainly am not glad it isn't merely a personality trait. Regardless of the fact that autism is a disorder that causes me problems.... I do like it's good points and I do embrace who I am. That isn't going to stop me struggling without help though. But yes. It does have its good points. Read this if you're interested on that more:

https://www.newstatesman.com/society/201...m-autistic

I am not against parents choosing the color of someone's eyes if they can, as that isn't important. Blue eyes are just as good as green and brown just as good as both. Etc. I'm not against parents not wanting their children to be born with a gene that gave their children great deal of pain as well. But if one day all parents chose for all their children to be born without any autistic genes? To be full neurotypicals? I would be against that for the reason argued for in the above article I just linked. The world is better off overall with at least some autism.

But no, that doesn't mean that the struggles of autism are not real. They are very real.
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#46
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
HammyThat's probably my favorite Beatles song actually.

Although I prefer the original for sure:




And now imagine what it would look like if they uploaded the whole damn thing and didn't keep people from trying to fill the void and upload it themselves.

And now, before it gets struck for copyright:





Listen now before the Michael Jackson estate copyright claims it into oblivion!
I was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad.

[Image: harmlesskitchen.png]

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#47
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
(March 26, 2018 at 3:05 pm)Minimalist Wrote: Sometimes I wonder if we aren't doing more harm than good by categorizing people like this.  People used to simply be "different."  Was that such a bad thing?  The word wasn't even coined until 1911 and then only to refer to schizophrenics.  Now it has exploded to the point where the scale is so vast that it seems to be everywhere.  They pump kids full of ritalin or other drugs at the drop of a hat these days because they can't sit still in class and the schools hate that so they are willing co-conspirators with the drug industry because they want obedience.  I don't know.  It seems to me that someone is making a whole lot of money off of this.

I'm probably just being a cranky old fart, again. 

Anyway, Hammy.  As far as I'm concerned you're fine.

I’m sorry, but it certainly was a bad thing when kids were getting in trouble for not getting the right grades, or for freaking out in certain social settings, or for doing things the wrong way when they just couldn’t. If my son was placed in a regular classroom and his specific needs were ignored, he’d be miserable and his quality of life would be minimal. If I didn’t understand that I need to communicate differently with him, he would have never progressed as much as he has. He needed early childhood intervention and he needs extra attention and assistance. Just different isn’t enough and it’s unfair for them. Maybe someone is making a lot of money, so? So do doctors and we need them. My son had a dentist appointment today and I took him to his dad’s house afterwards. I had to come home and sleep for two hours, because it drained me. Try explaining to the dental assistant that he doesn’t understand if you use clever phrases like, “You’ll love it to death!” He cried thinking he was going to die. Try explaining that I prepared him for that visit for days and it was ruined by the assistant losing her patience and bringing in two more. A crowded room of strangers? Try explaining that he doesn’t understand so many instructions grouped together and you need to say one at a time and wait to make sure he understands before jumping to the next. Try watching your son being scolded because he won’t stay still when her hand is on his back and it’s freaking him out. He doesn’t understand you and you’re expecting him to cooperate? When people know there’s a condition and they’re informed, it can cause a dental appointment to go smoothly. Knowing is important. Just different isn’t enough. His dad says he’s back to not talking at his house. His silence can last a day, weeks, months. That dental assistant probably went home bitching about the annoying little kid who’s six, but acts like he’s three and his mom doesn't see that he just needs more discipline. Meanwhile, I'll be cleaning up the mess.
"Hipster is what happens when young hot people do what old ladies do." -Exian
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#48
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
Minimalist is of the older generation. Of course they would think like that. And what does Ritalin have to do with autism? lol, man. I like you, but damn ...

(March 22, 2018 at 5:03 pm)Rev. Rye Wrote: So, how many does this make us? There’s me, Grandizer, Lutrinae, and you. Is that it for AF members (at least the currently active ones) on the Autism Spectrum or has someone else here come out on some other thread that I somehow managed to miss, alongside all the times Jack said she was a Mexican?

Is there anything else to say but “Welcome to the the club, Hammy”?

I wouldn't be surprised if the percentage of active members here on the spectrum was a bit higher than the percentage of the general population. Forums like this are like a magnet for us.

Oh, and as for Lutrinae, I was the one who suggested in the past he look into this and see if it plausibly matches his experience. Looks like he's seeking a diagnosis after all.
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#49
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
ADHD is a very real condition too, but it's ADHD that gets prescribed Ritalin, not autism.

Minimalist, at least get the condition right before you give us your opinions lol. It almost makes you seem like you have no idea what the fuck you're talking about! Shy

(March 22, 2018 at 6:41 pm)mlmooney89 Wrote: I think now you will be able to feel better about yourself.

I feel better about myself already Heart You're right. I don't feel like a loser or weirdo anymore.

(March 26, 2018 at 11:41 pm)Rev. Rye Wrote:



Listen now before the Michael Jackson estate copyright claims it into oblivion!

Heh. It may be my favorite Beetles song but I wouldn't really choose to listen to it. I'd just think it's alright if it came on the radio.

Here's what I'm choosing to listen to on loop all day today:



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#50
RE: Autism Spectrum Disorder
I've been trying to get on the spectrum for years but all they'd give me is depression.
One time I was upgraded to psychotic depression but it was only a limited time offer.
I was really hoping I could get a diagnosis that would absolve me of all the shitty ways I've acted towards friends and family, all the violence of my youth and the handful of minor crimes I've been convicted for.
(Interstate drug trafficking is a major crime but I had less than a pound so I still consider it minor.)
In the end I've had to realise I'm just not as great a person as I thought I was or wanted to be.
And since I've stepped up to the plate and owned my behaviours, I think I might actually be becoming a better person after all.
Anyway, that entire story was just about me, there's no hidden message in it for you autistic people out there.
Personally, I think autism wouldn't be so much of a problem if it wasn't for all the normals out there and their normal expectations.
Most of the normal people I've ever met are so fucking boring. :-)
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