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Current time: September 18, 2019, 10:11 am

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Literalism and Autism
#1
Literalism and Autism
Atheists often ask how do I determine whats literal and non-literal in the Bible.

I point out thats, easy, by treating the Bible as I would any other text, or figure of speech, or everyday language, and determine whether it was meant to be taken literal or non-literal (sarcastically, hyperbolically, metaphorically, etc...). We do based on a variety of contextual cues.  I manage doing this pretty well, without anyway having to telling me that they were being sarcastic, etc.... I was under the impression that most people do so as well. 

But people still seem confused, as if they have trouble in everyday language as well.  As if, many people here struggle in ways similar to how people on the autistic spectrum struggle. The tendency among folks on the spectrum, is that they're inclined to read things very literally, and struggle to understand non-literal expressions. So if you tell an autistic child to step on it, to get them moving faster, they'll possibly ask you what should they step on? 

You have to make all sorts of accommodations to ensure your child on the spectrum understands what you're saying, and avoid non-literal expressions as much as possible. 



There seems to be some parallel between that and the issue with recognizing non-literalism in religious text. And I can't tell if that's because many people here are on the spectrum, if something akin to the sort of tendency of people on the spectrum, has been repeated by a person's environmental factors. Or if they're just pulling my leg, when they act is if they struggle with such distinctions.  

Qs:

Do you struggle with deciphering literal and non-literal expressions in everyday language and elsewhere, and therefore struggle with doing so when reading the Bible? 

Is everywhere else just fine, just when it comes to the Bible, and religious texts that you struggle with making such distinctions? 
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#2
RE: Literalism and Autism
A god of confusion, how wonderful.

I consider the whole book absurd, so no problem here.
God(s) and religions are man made and the bane of humanity. 

Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most. Ozzy or Twain/take your pick
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#3
RE: Literalism and Autism
And you don't struggle?
You got the bible all worked out.
Well, you better ring your friends and tell them cause they've struggled with it for a couple a thousand years.




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#4
RE: Literalism and Autism
(September 9, 2019 at 8:48 am)Little lunch Wrote: And you don't struggle?
You got the bible all worked out.
Well, you better ring your friends and tell them cause they've struggled with it for a couple a thousand years.

Ist it ...interesting that every single christian (denomination) claims to have found out what the bible exactly means and that everyone else, particularly other christians are utterly wrong. Then comes the doubling down by claiming its so easy to interpret. As if everyone else is not only wrong but horrendly stupid/autistic...for the past 2ky.  Naughty
Cetero censeo religionem delendam esse
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#5
RE: Literalism and Autism
So...people who wonder if a particular Biblical passage is meant literally are autistic?

Boru
'A man is accepted into a church for what he believes.  He is turned out for what he knows.' - Mark Twain
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#6
RE: Literalism and Autism
(September 9, 2019 at 12:22 pm)BrianSoddingBoru4 Wrote: So...people who wonder if a particular Biblical passage is meant literally are autistic?

Boru

No that’s a strawman.
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#7
RE: Literalism and Autism
(September 9, 2019 at 12:48 pm)Acrobat Wrote:
(September 9, 2019 at 12:22 pm)BrianSoddingBoru4 Wrote: So...people who wonder if a particular Biblical passage is meant literally are autistic?

Boru

No that’s a strawman.


Doesn't seem to be.

Quote:But people still seem confused, as if they have trouble in everyday language as well.  As if, many people here struggle in ways similar to how people on the autistic spectrum struggle.


Boru
'A man is accepted into a church for what he believes.  He is turned out for what he knows.' - Mark Twain
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#8
RE: Literalism and Autism
(September 9, 2019 at 12:22 pm)BrianSoddingBoru4 Wrote: So...people who wonder if a particular Biblical passage is meant literally are autistic?

Boru

If you don't share the same opinion as me, you have a developmental disability. LMFAO. This dude is a riot.

@Acrobat

And what a minute, you've said in multiple threads that it's difficult to interpret Biblical texts because it's supposed to be? Because god wants us to have to work through the text and work for what it means to be a Christian.

Now you're claiming it's easy?
“Feelings come and go like clouds in a windy sky. Conscious breathing is my anchor.” - Thich Nhat Hanh

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#9
RE: Literalism and Autism
(September 9, 2019 at 4:53 pm)BrianSoddingBoru4 Wrote:
(September 9, 2019 at 12:48 pm)Acrobat Wrote: No that’s a strawman.


Doesn't seem to be.

Quote:But people still seem confused, as if they have trouble in everyday language as well.  As if, many people here struggle in ways similar to how people on the autistic spectrum struggle.


Boru

I was referring to reading the Bible as a whole, not just one particular passage.
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#10
RE: Literalism and Autism
This is a very ignorant OP.

The issue with some (not all) people with autism is that they take phrases hyper-literally, not literally. What you're trying to address has little, if any, to do with hyper-literalness.
"Our attitudes towards things like race or gender operate on two levels. First of all, we have our conscious attitudes. This is what we choose to believe. These are our stated values, which we use to direct our behavior deliberately ... But the IAT [Implicit Association Test] measures something else. It measures our second level of attitude, our racial attitude on an unconscious level - the immediate, automatic associations that tumble out before we've even had time to think. We don't deliberately choose our unconscious attitudes. And ... we may not even be aware of them. The giant computer that is our unconscious silently crunches all the data it can from the experiences we've had, the people we've met, the lessons we've learned, the books we've read, the movies we've seen, and so on, and it forms an opinion." - Malcolm Gladwell
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