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My Astro Photo Of The Day
#41
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
(October 26, 2010 at 1:39 pm)leo-rcc Wrote: 14

Shineylight and leo are close, but no cigars.
'The difference between a Miracle and a Fact is exactly the difference between a mermaid and seal. It could not be expressed better.'
-- Samuel "Mark Twain" Clemens

"I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the scriptures, but with experiments, demonstrations, and observations".

- Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

"In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! "

- Dr. Donald Prothero
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#42
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
19.
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#43
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
I suppose going directly between the two was a smart thing to do Wink
"God is dead" - Friedrich Nietzsche

"Faith is what you have in things that DON'T exist. - Homer J. Simpson
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#44
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
Yup. He didn't give any clues as to how close either of you were, so the mean number is probably the best bet. Now we play the waiting game...
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#45
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
Drumroll, please!!!

[Image: stephensquinteta.jpg]

The number is 13 (although there are actually a couple more, they aren't seen in this image, being very very faint). The boxed group is the famous Stephen's Quintet, several of which are in close gravitational interaction. These galaxies are all in the constellation Pegasus. I can't wait to take another, much deeper stab at this region. There are lots of galaxies in this region of the sky.

Enjoy.

Note: I just realized that I made a mistake. The galaxy below Stephen's Quintet is apparently not listed in the Sky 6 (the program I use to control my mount). I'll have to research that one.
'The difference between a Miracle and a Fact is exactly the difference between a mermaid and seal. It could not be expressed better.'
-- Samuel "Mark Twain" Clemens

"I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the scriptures, but with experiments, demonstrations, and observations".

- Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

"In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! "

- Dr. Donald Prothero
Reply
#46
Fiesta Time!
[Image: m104-1-1.jpg]

Messier 104, The Sombrero Galaxy, In The Constellation Virgo

Image (cropped):

5x4 minutes for a total of 20 minutes
Stacked in DeepSkyStacker, Dark Subtracted
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CS3 Extended
Taken on April 24, 2010 at the Louisville Astronomical Society Observatory, in Curby, Indiana

Equipment:

200 mm f5 Konus Newtonian
Losmandy G11 Gemini GOTO mount on Heavy Duty Tripod
Orion Shorty Autoguide Scope with Starshooter autoguider

From Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombrero_Galaxy

The Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M 104 or NGC 4594 ) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.
'The difference between a Miracle and a Fact is exactly the difference between a mermaid and seal. It could not be expressed better.'
-- Samuel "Mark Twain" Clemens

"I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the scriptures, but with experiments, demonstrations, and observations".

- Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

"In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! "

- Dr. Donald Prothero
Reply
#47
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day - Alnitak and Vicinity
[Image: alnitak_vicinity-1.jpg]

Alnitak and Vicinity

Although I had surgery on my left shoulder back in October, I couldn't resist such a clear, dry night as last night for doing some Astronomy. So with the help of a Friend, I went to the observatory site last night at tooks a bunch of pictures. Here is the first of several to come.

Alnitak (Zeta Orionis) is a triple star some 800 light years distant in the constellation Orion. It is the leftmost star on Orion's Belt along with Delta Orionis (Mintaka) and Epsilon Orionis (Alnilam), stars not seen in this image. The primary star is a hot blue supergiant with an absolute magnitude of -5.25, and is the brightest class O star in the night sky with a visual magnitude of 1.70. It has two bluish 4th magnitude companions. The stars are members of The Orion OB1 Association.

Located 1500 light years away, and behind Alnitak are several spectacular star-forming regions, among them the famous dark Nebula B33 (The Horsehead nebula), to the lower right, and NGC 2024 (The Flame nebula), to the left. In addition to these famous night sky objects, other interesting features include NGC 2023 (one of the brightest sources of fluorescent molecular hydrogen in the galaxy), a reflection nebula to the lower left of the Horsehead Nebula, and IC 432 and IC 431, reflection nebulae which surround two of the bright stars to the left of Alnitak (unfortunately, only IC 432 shows up in this image, which can be seen surrounding the star just to the left of Alnitak near the left edge of the image).

These star-forming nebulae are part of the larger nebulae complex associated with the great Orion Nebula, and are part of the closest star-forming regions to our own solar system.

Image

6x4 minutes for a total of 24 minutes at ISO 1600
Stacked in DeepSkyStacker, Dark Subtracted
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CS3 Extended
Taken on November 8, 2010 at the Louisville Astronomical Society Observatory, in Curby, Indiana

Equipment:

Hutech Canon T1i DSLR
200 mm f5 Konus Newtonian
Losmandy G11 Gemini GOTO mount on Heavy Duty Tripod
Orion Shorty Autoguide Scope with Starshooter autoguider

Comments: I had some trouble with the autoguider last night due to unstable seeing conditions, and so the guiding on this image is less than desirable.

Next - the great Orion Nebula, M42. Stay tuned.
'The difference between a Miracle and a Fact is exactly the difference between a mermaid and seal. It could not be expressed better.'
-- Samuel "Mark Twain" Clemens

"I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the scriptures, but with experiments, demonstrations, and observations".

- Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

"In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! "

- Dr. Donald Prothero
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#48
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
Yay!! The star man is back! Hope you're healing well...
[Image: Untitled2_zpswaosccbr.png]
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#49
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day
(November 10, 2010 at 1:19 am)thesummerqueen Wrote: Yay!! The star man is back! Hope you're healing well...

Thanks. I think I overdid it last night, because I've been in a lot of pain all day today, and slept most of the day. But I think it was worth it. I got a lot of interesting images, which I will post here in coming days.
'The difference between a Miracle and a Fact is exactly the difference between a mermaid and seal. It could not be expressed better.'
-- Samuel "Mark Twain" Clemens

"I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the scriptures, but with experiments, demonstrations, and observations".

- Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

"In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! "

- Dr. Donald Prothero
Reply
#50
RE: My Astro Photo Of The Day - As Promised, M42, The Great Orion Nebula
[Image: M42a-1-1.jpg]

http://seds.org/messier/m/m042.html

As this is perhaps the most famous of all deep sky objects, I'll leave it to those who are interested to check out the Info on this object at the link above.

Image

11x1.5 minutes + 11x2.0 minutes for a total of 38.5 minutes at ISO 800
Stacked in DeepSkyStacker, Dark Subtracted
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CS3 Extended
Taken on November 8, 2010 at the Louisville Astronomical Society Observatory, in Curby, Indiana

Equipment:

Hutech Canon T1i DSLR
200 mm f5 Konus Newtonian with a Baader coma corrector and a UV/IR cut filter
Losmandy G11 Gemini GOTO mount on Heavy Duty Tripod
Orion Shorty Autoguide Scope with Starshooter autoguider

Comments: I had some trouble with the autoguider due to unstable seeing conditions, and so the guiding on this image is less than desirable. Despite the seeing problems, this is my best image to date of this object, but I am going to try later in the year, or early next year to go really deep and get some very long exposure time on it.

Enjoy,

OGM
'The difference between a Miracle and a Fact is exactly the difference between a mermaid and seal. It could not be expressed better.'
-- Samuel "Mark Twain" Clemens

"I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the scriptures, but with experiments, demonstrations, and observations".

- Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

"In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! "

- Dr. Donald Prothero
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