Our server costs ~$56 per month to run. Please consider donating or becoming a Patron to help keep the site running. Help us gain new members by following us on Twitter and liking our page on Facebook!
Current time: October 6, 2022, 7:49 pm

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
[Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
#1
[Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
In this topic I want to discuss "Anthropomorphism" and how it corrupts religion and the "image of God" in our heads.


"Anthropomorphism" is defined by:

Quote:Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropomorphism

Moreover, it's also removing any kind of respect the creature has to God. Since God is an entity that we can't imagine with our minds or even apply attributes to. Actually, we need a "word from God" first telling us how to approach him correctly, what traits to "apply to him" and what names should we call him with.

The Quran says about God:

Quote:Sura 112, The Quran:
https://quran.ksu.edu.sa/index.php?l=en#...rans=en_sh

( 1 )   Say, "He is Allah, [who is] One,
( 2 )   Allah, the Eternal Refuge.
( 3 )   He neither begets nor is born,
( 4 )   Nor is there to Him any equivalent."


Simply, we can't picture or imagine an "eternal refugee" who is "one and only", never was born or gave birth and has no equal.

But Anthropomorphism was always present in both "Christianity and Pagan religions -Judaism forbids it like Islam-:

Quote:Both Judaism and Islam reject an anthropomorphic deity, believing that God is beyond human comprehension. Judaism's rejection of an anthropomorphic deity grew during the Hasmonean period (circa 300 BCE), when Jewish belief incorporated some Greek philosophy.[1] Judaism's rejection grew further after the Islamic Golden Age in the tenth century, which Maimonides codified in the twelfth century, in his thirteen principles of Jewish faith.[e]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropomo..._mythology


God is beyond description, all we can do is take the description he gave in the Quran, and that's it.


Quote:In Islam, God (Arabic: ٱللَّٰه‎, romanizedAllāh, contraction of ٱلْإِلَٰه al-ʾilāh, lit. "the God")[1] is the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence.[1][2][3] Islam emphasizes that God is strictly singular ([i]tawḥīd[/i]); unique ([i]wāḥid[/i]); inherently One ([i]aḥad[/i]);[1][2][4] and also all-merciful and omnipotent.[5] No human eyes can see God until the Day of Judgement.[6] God doesn't depend on anything.[7] God has no parents and no children.[8]According to Islam, God is neither a material nor a spiritual being.[9]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_in_Islam
Reply
#2
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
Magic sky pixie is undescribable, proceeds to describe it as male.

Perhaps you need a better dictionary.
Reply
#3
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
(June 15, 2021 at 5:20 am)no one Wrote: Magic sky pixie is undescribable, proceeds to describe it as male.

Perhaps you need a better dictionary.


Quote:Islam
Main article: God in Islam
[ambiguous]
The oneness of God is of primary importance in the Quran and Islam. In the Quran, Allah is most often referred to with the pronouns Hu or Huwa, and although these are commonly translated as "him", they can also be translated gender-neutrally, as "them". This is also true of the feminine equivalent, Hiya. Quran 112:3–4 states: "He begets not, nor is He begotten. And none is like Him [Them]." Other references include the first person pronoun, and the relative pronoun ma ('that which'), as in the phrase "the heavens and that which created them" (Quran 91:5).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_of_God#Islam

Please read Sura 112, which is very short and answers your argument better(see the OP). God is gender-neutral and assigning gender to him is actually a type of Anthropomorphism.
Reply
#4
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
One of Allah's most common sobriquets is 'the Merciful'. Mercy is an exclusively human emotion. Allah is therefore anthropomorphized.

Boru
‘Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.’ Ralph Waldo Emerson
Reply
#5
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
(June 15, 2021 at 4:42 am)WinterHold Wrote: God is an entity that we can't imagine with our minds

I wonder if the tendency to anthropomorphize has something to do with the fact that the big religions are supposed to be for everybody, including both the educated and the illiterate. 

So for example Americans think of Taoism as being philosophical and abstract, because the Tao Te Ching has been fairly well known in English. It doesn't talk about a Big Father or a scary Hell. But I know that (pre-Mao) if you went to a Taoist temple in China there would likely be paintings of Hell to scare the simple people into behaving themselves. There was a difficult version for people who were better educated, and another version for the regular folk.

It's just easier to imagine a Heavenly Father than an apophatic divine. So the elites were comfortable with a simplified version for the common folk, which took the symbols more at face value. No doubt it offends our modern democratic feelings today, but I think a two-tier approach was common in Taoism, Buddhism, and Christianity. 

But I don't know about Islam.
Reply
#6
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
(June 15, 2021 at 4:42 am)WinterHold Wrote: In this topic I want to discuss "Anthropomorphism" and how it corrupts religion and the "image of God" in our heads.


"Anthropomorphism" is defined by:

Quote:Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropomorphism

Moreover, it's also removing any kind of respect the creature has to God. Since God is an entity that we can't imagine with our minds or even apply attributes to. Actually, we need a "word from God" first telling us how to approach him correctly, what traits to "apply to him" and what names should we call him with.

The Quran says about God:

Quote:Sura 112, The Quran:
https://quran.ksu.edu.sa/index.php?l=en#...rans=en_sh

( 1 )   Say, "He is Allah, [who is] One,
( 2 )   Allah, the Eternal Refuge.
( 3 )   He neither begets nor is born,
( 4 )   Nor is there to Him any equivalent."


Simply, we can't picture or imagine an "eternal refugee" who is "one and only", never was born or gave birth and has no equal.

But Anthropomorphism was always present in both "Christianity and Pagan religions -Judaism forbids it like Islam-:

Quote:Both Judaism and Islam reject an anthropomorphic deity, believing that God is beyond human comprehension. Judaism's rejection of an anthropomorphic deity grew during the Hasmonean period (circa 300 BCE), when Jewish belief incorporated some Greek philosophy.[1] Judaism's rejection grew further after the Islamic Golden Age in the tenth century, which Maimonides codified in the twelfth century, in his thirteen principles of Jewish faith.[e]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropomo..._mythology


God is beyond description, all we can do is take the description he gave in the Quran, and that's it.


Quote:In Islam, God (Arabic: ٱللَّٰه‎, romanizedAllāh, contraction of ٱلْإِلَٰه al-ʾilāh, lit. "the God")[1] is the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence.[1][2][3] Islam emphasizes that God is strictly singular ([i]tawḥīd[/i]); unique ([i]wāḥid[/i]); inherently One ([i]aḥad[/i]);[1][2][4] and also all-merciful and omnipotent.[5] No human eyes can see God until the Day of Judgement.[6] God doesn't depend on anything.[7] God has no parents and no children.[8]According to Islam, God is neither a material nor a spiritual being.[9]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_in_Islam

"God is beyond description", your words.

I agree, so why would I want to take the words of a book written by ignorant humans?

"God is neither a material nor a spiritual being", again your quote.

Sounds like you are describing the non existent.
Reply
#7
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
Since my first description didn't sway you, I shall double down and now describe a not so descript description, describing the aforementioned undescribable.
Reply
#8
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
At work.

I too love how the Abrahamic believers ascribe all these 'Unknowable' attributes to their diety (WLC throws in all the 'Timeless', 'Space-less, 'Form-less' etc things as well) but then insist all these OTHER quite mundane and 'Human' traits like 'Love', 'Compassion', 'Vengance'......

Because their 'Unknowable' diety simply has to know about them.

Almost makes one think they're into wanting a more 'Fluffy-thuhlu' than the real, mind bending thing. Perhaps they'd rather have their phsyche ripped asunder rather than being devoured first?

Coffee
Reply
#9
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
Allah, "eternal refugee"? Hilarious
I don't have an anger problem, I have an idiot problem




Reply
#10
RE: [Quranic Reflection]: Anthropomorphism and God in Islam
(June 15, 2021 at 4:42 am)WinterHold Wrote: God is beyond description, all we can do is take the description he gave in the Quran, and that's it.

So the god of Muslims is the right one because Muslims say so (the Muslim holy book). Circular reasoning.
teachings of the Bible are so muddled and self-contradictory that it was possible for Christians to happily burn heretics alive for five long centuries. It was even possible for the most venerated patriarchs of the Church, like St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas, to conclude that heretics should be tortured (Augustine) or killed outright (Aquinas). Martin Luther and John Calvin advocated the wholesale murder of heretics, apostates, Jews, and witches. - Sam Harris, "Letter To A Christian Nation"
Reply



Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  [Quranic reflection]: What is time? WinterHold 13 589 July 29, 2022 at 3:11 am
Last Post: BrianSoddingBoru4
  [Quranic reflection]: The Big Bang theory in the Quran. WinterHold 62 2106 June 14, 2022 at 1:21 pm
Last Post: The Grand Nudger
  [Quranic reflection]: hell is a black hole-part III WinterHold 71 2203 May 8, 2022 at 3:33 pm
Last Post: JairCrawford
  [Quranic Reflection]: Quran vs Hadith- why the Hadith is false WinterHold 176 5423 January 15, 2022 at 2:39 pm
Last Post: Angrboda
  [Quranic reflection]: hell is a black hole-part II WinterHold 38 1167 December 21, 2021 at 1:30 am
Last Post: Anomalocaris
  [Quranic Reflection]: God is the light of the universe. WinterHold 35 2789 September 12, 2021 at 11:52 am
Last Post: BrianSoddingBoru4
  [Quranic Reflection]: the Hajj. WinterHold 99 8633 August 2, 2021 at 2:21 pm
Last Post: GUBU
  [Quranic Reflection]: On reading the Quran.. WinterHold 1 425 July 24, 2021 at 5:23 pm
Last Post: onlinebiker
  [Quranic Reflection]: The Romans destroying of the Jewish temple, would it happen? WinterHold 15 639 May 12, 2021 at 4:54 am
Last Post: The Grand Nudger
  [Quranic Reflection]: is being closed minded the cause of disbelief ? WinterHold 26 1152 February 4, 2021 at 8:48 am
Last Post: Ten



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)