Our server costs ~$56 per month to run. Please consider donating or becoming a Patron to help keep the site running. Help us gain new members by following us on Twitter and liking our page on Facebook!
Current time: May 22, 2022, 3:52 pm

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Mental gymnastics from the brain-eating religion
#11
RE: Mental gymnastics from the brain-eating religion
As a former Anglican, I was told that the communion, baptism, confirmation are sacraments of the faith, and that sacraments are "outer symbols of an inward grace".

That is, nothing magic is occurring, other than we are making an outward show and declaration that we have received the grace of God.

Yes, the Catholic Church still claims they are all magic. No-one else does

(Well, the evangelicals believe in the literal receiving of the holy spirit, and the Anglican church still has the same rules as the Catholics over not letting unbaptized have bread or wine, consuming everything rather than throwing it out, and burning flooring or carpeting that any substantial amount of spilled wine gets on)
Reply
#12
RE: Mental gymnastics from the brain-eating religion
(June 28, 2021 at 12:53 pm)Neo-Scholastic Wrote: Hmmm...this doctrine is called called a mystery but it really is not as mysterious as it seems. The sacrament changes the final cause but not the material cause. The result is a new substance in the Scholastic sense for using the word substance, i.e. as the manifestation of causes in a single unity. Catholic use the same wording when referring to their denomination as the body of Christ as they do the host, also referred to as body of Christ. My translation would be something like this is the people (food, texts, etc.) dedicated as a means for fulfilling Christ's redemtive purpose in the world.

Church-speak is kind of a pet peeve of mine. And yet this is a nomenclature refined over 2000 years to be as exact as possible so another pet peeve of mine is when people unfamiliar with the jargon go off on it.

I think that's about the most charitably as it can be put. Still, as someone who was raised Catholic, I wonder if it isn't put a bit too charitably.

We were taught that once the Eucharist is performed, the bread and wine that has been "transubstantiated" must be stored in the tabernacle and every last bit of it consumed. I know there's some nuance to it, but this sort of treatment of snacks and beverages smacks of superstition. 

According to the Church, it's the only thing in the building that is holy. The crucifix is a reminder, nothing holy about it. The alter is an instrument... nothing holy about it. But the wafers and wine (after the Eucharist)... those are treated as holy. THOSE are why the priest kneels and crosses himself as he approaches the alter... etc.
Reply
#13
RE: Mental gymnastics from the brain-eating religion
I agree that within Catholic traditions the distinction between sacred and mundane is much more scrupilously maintained. IMHO, it can off putting and excessive. As an outside admirer of the Church of Rome, I try to stay cognizant of the difference between its doctrines and the cultural baggage that has accumulated around those doctrines.
<insert profound quote here>
Reply
#14
RE: Mental gymnastics from the brain-eating religion
The Catholics are saying that Jesus said that the bread was his body.; the wine his blood; and that he asked them to do it (have his body and blood) in remembrance of him.

Meh!

Sounds a bit cannibalistic to me now that I no longer am in the Church, but back when I was, it made sense to me. That is the way with "belief." When it gets hold of you, it feels as though it is steadying rather than binding you.

(June 28, 2021 at 2:00 pm)Neo-Scholastic Wrote: I agree that within Catholic traditions the distinction between sacred and mundane is much more scrupilously maintained. IMHO, it can off putting and excessive. As an outside admirer of the Church of Rome, I  try to stay cognizant of the difference between its doctrines and the cultural baggage that has accumulated around those doctrines.

One of my fondest memories is the time I serve Mass in St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican. I was in service at the time...stationed in England and visiting Rome on a religious retreat.

Hell of a memory...even for a heathen agnostic type like me.
Reply



Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Which is the cause, which the effect: religious fundamentalism <=> brain impairment Whateverist 31 3771 March 20, 2018 at 3:20 pm
Last Post: The Grand Nudger
  I don't believe in Christianity primarily because of the brain SerenelyBlue 111 9517 September 20, 2016 at 12:30 am
Last Post: Cecelia
  Slavery and eating animals Grasshopper 124 12219 February 7, 2015 at 11:47 am
Last Post: The Grand Nudger
  Indoctrination & Mental Gymnastics Glitch 180 13727 January 19, 2015 at 1:59 pm
Last Post: The Grand Nudger
  Simple mental exercise to show the irrationality of the Christian God. CoolBoy 29 12023 September 1, 2012 at 9:05 pm
Last Post: kılıç_mehmet
  Christianity & Mental Illness Logic 27 8734 April 13, 2012 at 8:48 am
Last Post: Faith No More
  A and E could not know love without eating of the TOK. Greatest I am 8 2856 September 2, 2011 at 2:50 pm
Last Post: Greatest I am
  The mind brain connection Captain Scarlet 28 6380 August 17, 2010 at 5:38 am
Last Post: Edwardo Piet



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)